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Review: Beyerdynamic DT250 Headphones

In an ideal world a nearby store will have the product we’re interested in, along with a range of makes and models for us to make accurate comparisons. In the real world this is unlikely to be the case, and we may even find ourselves having to place an order based entirely on reviews. This is what happened when I was in the market for a pair of good quality, respectable, £100-£150 studio headphones.

Beyerdynamic DT250 Headphones

The Beyerdynamic DT250s, at around £120, came to my attention, immediately fulfilling two of my requirements. With the Beyer name comes respectability – they specialize in headphones and microphones, and don’t make digital cameras, TV sets, etc. – and the price fitted my budget.

I have read various reviews on the DT250 headphones ranging from ‘glowing’ to ‘satisfactory’, so a further real-user review might help to narrow the gap and place these headphones in a more definite slot.

The basic factors to consider when choosing headphones are design, build quality, sound, comfort, and price, although not necessarily in that order. So, starting with design, the DT250s are closed back, circumaural (meaning they fit over the ears) headphones, specifically designed for studio or broadcast work.

The build quality is very good, having a sturdy feel. The cord connects to the headphones via a seven-pin plug, which is further secured in place by a small screw. It’s reassuring to know that any damage to the cord isn’t going to result in an expensive headphone repair. At the other end of the cord is a 3.5mm gold plated stereo jack which screws into an adaptor to convert this to a standard quarter-inch stereo jack, which is also gold plated.

The sound I would describe as ‘revealing’. Listening to my favourite recordings I could hear details that I hadn’t noticed before. However, the sound is in no way flattering – being true studio monitor headphones it’s not meant to be. Technically, the frequency response is quoted as 10Hz-30kHz although no reference parameters are given. The bass extends quite well and the treble is all there without sounding brash.

The low level of sound spill makes these headphones very good for overdubbing, and I have received compliments from singers who have used them when recording. I’ll often use these phones to check a mix, and the two ‘Around The Globe’ radio jingles, elsewhere on this site, were actually mixed primarily on these headphones.

As far as comfort goes, the DT250s sit firmly on the head, ideal for musicians in a studio that might move around a bit, yet I have never found them uncomfortably tight.

With the DT250s you have a choice of either 80 or 250 ohm versions. Either will work fine with modern professional studio gear but it’s always best to check the manufacturer’s recommendation regarding the headphone impedance range for any equipment being used. However, as a general rule, if you intend to use the headphones with equipment having a low output level, which might include some portable recording devices or video cameras for example, the 80 ohm versions will probably be the best bet. On the other hand, if you intend to run two or more pairs of headphones from just one headphone output socket then the 250 ohm versions will be best.

In conclusion, I find these good all round studio headphones, great for overdubbing, good for checking a mix, and their robustness instils confidence in their longevity. There’s a lot of choice on the market, but I feel that with the DT250s you can’t go far wrong, so much so that I bought a second pair!


(I would like to affirm to the reader that I have no connection with Beyerdynamic, and have received no payment or benefits from any source for writing this review. It is a true customer/user review.)

 

 


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Just arrived on this site:

May 29, 2017. New this month is a selection of six Royalty Free Radio Jingles.

April 30, 2017. After a half-year break from adding new material to this site, I've added an article / review on Headphone Holders.

Sept. 29, 2016. In the final part of how to design and build a DIY Music Production Desk, I show the finished product, and provide further information on cost, construction time and more.

Aug. 30, 2016. In Part 4 of how to design and build a DIY Music Production Desk, I talk about stainng and varnishing.

July 12, 2016. This month, in Part 3 of how to design and build a DIY Music Production Desk, I detail the construction process.

June 16, 2016. This month, in Part 2 of how to design and build a DIY Music Production Desk, I look at the preparation needed..

May 30, 2016. This month sees the start of a series on how to design and build a DIY Music Production Desk. Part 1 this month looks at the design process.

April 29, 2016. This month I have added a short article on Trumpet Psychology to the Musicians' Corner - an essential read for aspiring professionals.

March 29, 2016. This month the Selected CD Reviews section has been updated with four additional audio files.

Feb. 24, 2016. A new photo has been added to the Gallery of a Valentine's Day concert I played at this month, accompanying various artists.

Jan. 14, 2016. New in the Reviews section this month is a look at PMC's TB2 Nearfield Monitors.

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Sometime Somewhere...

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A relaxing Smooth Jazz CD. Listen to extracts of all 12 tracks now.

 

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